Note: The following is the public notice that HUD required to be posted in July of 2009 as part of the Consortium's application for NSP2 funding

Overview
MIAMI-DADE NSP CONSORTIUM
HUD Application # 778375024

Six nonprofit organizations in Miami-Dade County, Florida and the City of North Miami are submitting as a consortium (Consortium) to U.S. HUD for $89,375,000 of funding from the Neighborhood Stabilization Program 2 (NSP2). Neighborhood Housing Services of South Florida (NHSSF) will serve as the lead agency for the Consortium consisting of the City, NHSSF, Carrfour Supportive Housing (Carrfour), Little Haiti Housing Association (LHHA), Opa-locka Community Development Corporation (OLCDC), St. John Community Development Corporation (SJCDC) and the Urban League of Greater Miami (ULGM).

The Consortium is targeting the completion of 1,255 units of rental and homeownership housing, with potential to roll over funds to an additional 116 units, in census tracts with the greatest need in the cities of Miami Gardens, North Miami, North Miami Beach and Opa-locka, the neighborhoods of Liberty City, Little Haiti, Little River and Overtown in the City of Miami and the neighborhoods of Brownsville, Model City/Liberty City and West Little River in unincorporated Miami-Dade County. The Consortium has identified census tracts to more specifically define the targeted neighborhoods. Consistent with the purposes of the NSP program, these are neighborhoods that are in decline (or further decline) due to the negative effects of a high number and percentage of homes that have been foreclosed upon.

The nonprofit members of the Consortium have been active in these neighborhoods for many years. Over the past two years, they have completed 735 units of rental and homeownership housing, have provided counseling and homebuyer education to nearly 2,300 families, resulting in over 260 new homeowners and originated mortgage financing for over 100 homeowners.

In these targeted neighborhoods, the Consortium will implement a neighborhood stabilization and revitalization strategy that will seek to meet the primary objective of the CDBG and NSP programs of providing decent housing, a suitable living environment, and economic opportunity, principally for persons of low, moderate and middle-incomes. The NSP2 funds will assist in addressing the housing component of this strategy. Specific short-term outcomes in the targeted neighborhoods the Consortium seeks to accomplish include the following:

Specific long-term outcomes in the targeted neighborhoods the Consortium seeks to accomplish include the following:

The Consortium will strive to achieve these outcomes in coordination with other government agencies and programs. Consistent with the NSP2 emphasis, we seek a more rational use of land and other natural resources and the better arrangement of residential, commercial, industrial, recreational, and other uses. We will seek to conserve energy resources, improve energy efficiency, and utilize alternative and renewable energy sources. We will seek to make our developments sustainable and transit-oriented. We will support projects that optimize economic activity and jobs created or retained or that will provide other long-term economic benefits.

To achieve these outcomes, the Consortium will undertake the following activities.

The Consortium will meet NSP income targeting requirements serving persons earning at or below 120% Area Median Income (AMI) with at least 25% of the funds serving individuals and families with incomes at or below 50% AMI. We expect to achieve deeper income targeting than required with a high percentage of funds serving persons earning at or below 80% AMI and by producing units serving as low as below 30% AMI.

Specifically, the requested funds will be targeted to the following NSP�eligible activities.

Proposed NSP2 Activity

Proposed Budget

Responsible Entities

(A) Establish financing mechanisms for purchase and redevelopment of foreclosed upon homes and

residential properties, including such mechanisms as soft-seconds, loan loss reserves, and shared-equity loans for low- and moderate-income homebuyers

$0


(B) Purchase and rehabilitate homes and residential properties that have been abandoned or foreclosed upon, in order to sell, rent, or redevelop such homes and properties

$58,100,000

Carrfour, LHHA,

NHSSF, OLCDC, SJCDC

(C) Establish land banks for homes and residential properties that have been foreclosed upon

$0


(D) Demolish blighted structures

$0


(E) Redevelop demolished or vacant properties as housing

$27,625,000

Urban League

SJCDC, LHHA

Administration

$3,650,000

NHSSF

TOTAL REQUEST

$89,375,000



NOTE: Some funds used to purchase and rehabilitate homes under (B) will remain with the units as second mortgage financing for homebuyers. Some funds will roll over to purchase and rehabilitate additional units. The rolled over funds may then remain with the units as second mortgage financing for the homebuyers of the additional units.

The Consortium members will utilize other funds to augment these activities in our neighborhood stabilization and revitalization strategy. Additional activities with other funds can include commercial and economic development, business assistance, non�NSP housing development, improvement of owner occupied homes, housing counseling for residents purchasing non-NSP funded homes, foreclosure prevention, tenant case management, employment services, life skills training, drug and alcohol recovery support and after-school care.

In compiling the application, the Consortium has coordinated, and will continue to coordinate throughout the implementation, with Miami-Dade County and the Cities of Miami, Miami Gardens, North Miami Beach and Opa-locka, in addition to the Consortium member, the City of North Miami.


NHSSF NSP2 Consortium
Target Geography Census Tracts
June 20, 2009

Notes: The Column headings �Fully Contained� and �Partially Contained� refer to whether the tracts are fully or partially contained in the City or CDP. Census Tracts identified are fully contained in the Consortium target geography. Some tracts are partially contained in two Cities or CDPs and show more than once on the list.


City or CDP Name

Fully Contained

Partially Contained

Brownsville CDP

17.02

18.03


17.01*

18.01*

18.02*

Carol City CDP


100.02, 100.05, 100.06

100.07, 100.09, 100.10

94


El Portal Village


10.06*

Gladeview CDP


10.04*, 15.02*, 9.03*

Golden Glades CDP


3.01, 3.02


2.04*, 2.05*, 2.09*, 2.10*,

3.04*, 3.05*, 3.06*,

4.01*, 4.03*, 4.05*

Ives Estates CDP

98.01

98.02*

Lake Lucerne CDP

100.01

99.04*

Miami City


14.01, 14.02

15.01

19.01, 19.03, 19.04

20.01, 20.03, 20.04

22.01, 22.02,

23

26

28

31

34

36.01

10.02*, 10.04*, 10.06*

12.02*

15.02*

18.01*, 18.02*


Norland CDP


96

99.02

2.03*

2.04*

Other Tracts not in CDPs, identified by OLCDC

95.02

99.01, 99.03

4.02 (Bunche Park)


North Miami City


2.08


2.09*, 2.10*,

3.04*, 3.05*, 3.06*

4.01*, 4.05*

North Miami Beach City


2.06


2.01*, 2.02*, 2.03*, 2.04*, 2.05*

4.01*

Opa-locka city



4.01*, 4.03*

5.02*, 5.03*

Opa-locka North CDP

5.01


Pinewood CDP

10.05

4.06*, 4.07*, 4.08*

West Little River CDP


9.01

10.03


10.02*, 10.06*,

4.07*, 4.08*

9.02*

Westview CDP


4.04


4.05*, 4.07*, 4.08*

5.03*





MIAMI-DADE NSP CONSORTIUM APPLICATION

NARRATIVE STATEMENTS ADDRESSING SCORING FACTORS

Application # 778375024

Six nonprofit organizations in Miami-Dade County, Florida and the City of North Miami are submitting as a consortium (Consortium) to U.S. HUD for $89,375,000 of funding from the Neighborhood Stabilization Program 2 (NSP2). Neighborhood Housing Services of South Florida (NHSSF) will serve as the lead agency for the Consortium consisting of the City, NHSSF, Carrfour Supportive Housing (Carrfour), Little Haiti Housing Association (LHHA), Opa-locka Community Development Corporation (OLCDC), St. John Community Development Corporation (SJCDC) and the Urban League of Greater Miami (ULGM).

1. Factor 1: Need/Extent of the Problem (40 points)

a. Target geography. (10 points; also a threshold factor)

As identified in the Appendix, the Consortium is targeting census tracts with the greatest need in the northern part of Miami-Dade County, Florida. The target geography includes the cities of Miami Gardens, North Miami, North Miami Beach and Opa-locka, the neighborhoods of Liberty City, Little Haiti, Little River and Overtown in the City of Miami and the neighborhoods of Brownsville, Model City/Liberty City and West Little River in unincorporated Miami-Dade County. Consistent with the purposes of the NSP program, these are neighborhoods that are in decline (or further decline) due to the negative effects of a high number and percentage of homes that have been foreclosed upon.

Local housing market - Each of the census tracts in the target geography has a foreclosure needs index score of the maximum 20. Therefore, the average foreclosure needs index score for the identified target geography is the maximum 20. Within Miami-Dade County, foreclosures are estimated at approximately 11,000 for April 2009. For the one-year period prior to that, there were approximately 65,985 foreclosure filings within Miami-Dade County according to the Miami-Dade Clerk of the Courts. The estimated 90-day vacancy rate in the Consortium�s targeted geography is almost a full percentage point higher than Miami-Dade County as a whole, 4% compared to the County�s 3%. The City of Miami Commission District 5, with the majority of the City census tracts targeted by the Consortium, has the highest number of abandoned properties in the City.

Credit Needs: The Estimated High Cost Loan Rate, the percent of loans shown to be high cost according to HMDA data, in the Consortium�s targeted geography is 55%, considerably higher than the 41% of Miami-Dade County as a whole. The Consortium is targeting the majority of the census tracts in the City of Miami with more than 50% high cost loans shown in the following map.





Employment needs - According to the 2000 US Census, The City of Miami is the poorest city in the country. As of May 2009, the unemployment rate in Miami-Dade County was 8% (last year it was only 5%) and in the City of Miami, it was 9.4%.

Relationship of Factors � The high foreclosure and vacancy rates and high sub-prime mortgage rates in the Consortium�s targeted census tracts, combined with high unemployment rates make the Consortium�s geographic area a top priority for neighborhood stabilization activities. The rising unemployment rates will exacerbate the rate of foreclosures as heads of households lose their jobs and can�t pay their mortgages. It will be even more difficult for those heads of households that are holding high-cost, sub-prime mortgages. Foreclosures and vacancies are sure to rise dramatically in the Consortium�s targeted geographic area.

b. Market conditions and demand factors (30 points)

(1) Absorption � Miami-Dade County provides the following estimate of absorption of foreclosed properties without NSP2 funds. The table shows an inordinate amount of time required to absorb the inventory of anticipated foreclosed properties.


(2) Overbuilding � According to the Miami-Dade Planning Department, the excess supply of housing units within a time period may be approximated by the number of vacant housing units.

Miami-Dade County

2000

2004

2005

2006

2007

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total housing units

852,278

906,877

951,278

953,031

951,278

Occupied housing units

776,774

798,807

830,844

828,794

830,844

Vacant housing units**

75,504

108,070

120,434

124,237

120,434

Vacancy Rate

8.86

11.92

12.66

13.04

12.66







Vacancy Rate (%)

8.86

11.92

12.66

13.04

12.66


Based on the U.S. Census data, the vacancy rate in the County increased from 9 percent in 2000 to 12 percent in 2004 and reached 13 percent in 2006. The vacancy rate declined slightly in the next year. The overall vacancy rate, and its rapid rise from 8.8 percent in 2000, is the best indicator of over-building.

U.S. Census also provides data for specific categories of vacant housing units. Looking at homeowner and rental vacancies, for example, the number of vacant housing units offered for sale in Miami-Dade County was 10,989 while the number of vacant units offered for rent was 20,508. These numbers yield the rates of 1.3 percent and 2.4 percent, respectively, for rental vacancies and homeowner vacancies. Together, these categories of vacant units accounted for 3.69 percent of all 852,278 housing units in Miami Dade County in 2000.


Miami-Dade County

2000

2005-2007

2004

2005

2006

2007

US Census

ACS 3-year estimate

ACS 1-year estimate

ACS 1-year estimate

ACS 1-year estimate

ACS 1-year estimate

Homeowner vacancy rate

1.3

3.2

2.2

2.2

3.5

3.8

Rental vacancy rate

2.4

6.6

8.4

5.9

5.7

7.9

*U.S. Census, American Community Survey 3-Year Estimates given as reference only.

The figures in the three-year estimates for the vacant housing units for sale and for rent are close to the one-year estimates. Compared to the Census data from 2000, these figures indicate that the vacancy rate in these categories increased over time. The fluctuations in rental vacancy rate seem to be more pronounced than for the homeowner vacancy rates. Comparing the 2000 Census data and the ACS 1-year estimates, the homeowner vacancy rate almost tripled between 2000 and 2007 while the rental vacancy rate increased over two times.

(3) Income Characteristics and Housing Cost Burden

According to Miami-Dade County Planning Department, about 42 percent of the households in the County had an income between $35,000 and $99,000 in 2007. The income per capita was $ 23,125. According to the 2006 American Community Survey (ACS), approximately 54% of all occupied housing units, approximately 449,108 households, in Miami-Dade County are cost-burdened. Almost 75% of those households earn less than the AMI. Renters (61%) are most cost burdened.


Miami-Dade County

INCOME AND BENEFITS

(IN 2007 INFLATION-ADJUSTED DOLLARS)

Total households

833,199

100%

Less than $10,000

77,825

9.3%

$10,000 to $14,999

56,003

6.7%

$15,000 to $24,999

108,269

13.0%

$25,000 to $34,999

95,560

11.5%

$35,000 to $49,999

123,729

14.8%

$50,000 to $74,999

144,824

17.4%

$75,000 to $99,999

84,713

10.2%

$100,000 to $149,999

83,126

10.0%

$150,000 to $199,999

28,696

3.4%

$200,000 or more

30,454

3.7%

Median household income (dollars)

43,650

(X)

Mean household income (dollars)

63,863

(X)

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2007 American Community Survey

(4) Other relevant social, governmental, educational, or economic factors

Of all households in Miami-Dade County, 27.5% receive social security payments. Based on the 2005 -2007 three-year estimates, roughly 30% of the population 25 years and older has high school diploma or equivalent. The percentage of the residents with bachelor�s degree is 16 percent, closely followed by those with some college representing 15 percent of the population. About one-fourth of the population did not have a high school diploma. The 2007 ACS one-year estimates do not differ significantly from the three-year figures which indicate stable trends in the educational attainment in the County. The level of educational attainment should be interpreted considering the fact that more than one half of the total County population is foreign born (50.4%) of which 92.5 percent originates from Latin America. In addition, about 22 percent of the foreign born population arrived in the U.S. after 2007.


Miami-Dade County

EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT


Population 25 years and over

1,591,512

2005-2007 (%)

2007 (%)

Less than 9th grade

199,668

12.5%

12.3%

9th to 12th grade, no diploma

180,512

11.3%

10.8%

High school graduate (includes equivalency)

438,644

27.6%

28.3%

Some college, no degree

234,904

14.8%

14.2%

Associate's degree

128,147

8.1%

8.3%

Bachelor's degree

261,073

16.4%

16.9%

Graduate or professional degree

148,564

9.3%

9.2%

Percent high school graduate or higher

76.1%

(X)


Percent bachelor's degree or higher

25.7%

(X)


Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2005-2007 American Community Survey


(5) NSP2 Activity Categories Most Likely To Stabilize the Target Geography

The high foreclosure, vacancy and high cost loan rates and overbuilding in the Consortium�s target geography call for a strategy that includes significant acquisition and rehabilitation of foreclosed units. Without NSP2 funds, the absorption rate of the area is expected to be very low, extending through a long period of time. High unemployment rates, high levels of those on Social Security and high levels of those with less than or only high school education call for housing affordable to low and very low income households.

While these rates call for acquisition and rehabilitation of both rental and homeownership units, the high rental vacancies call for a particular emphasis on stabilizing foreclosed rental properties. The high percentage of renters that are cost burdened also calls for a significant emphasis on making rental housing more affordable. However, addressing the cost burden and also the high percentages of low, very low and extremely low-income households cannot rely solely on rehabilitated rental housing. Addressing these issues requires both acquisition & rehabilitation of existing units and the construction of new rental units on vacant land. The redevelopment of vacant land into affordable rental housing also eliminates the deterrent to stabilization that vacant properties mean to the neighborhood. A focus on previously developed land where buildings have been demolished and the land left vacant for years will help to further stimulate the stabilization and revitalization of the neighborhood.


2. Rating Factor 2: Demonstrated Capacity of the Applicant and Relevant Organizational Staff (40 points)

a. Past Experience of the applicant. (30 points)

Recent Experience: The nonprofit developer members of the Consortium have been active in the neighborhoods of the target geography for many years. Within the 24-month period immediately preceding the date of this NOFA, they have completed 735 units of rental and homeownership housing including the purchase and rehabilitation of 651 units and the redevelopment of demolished or vacant properties into 84 new-construction units.

Also within the 24-month period, they have provided counseling and homebuyer education to 2,294 families, resulting in 262 new homeowners and, along with the City member, originated mortgage financing for over 100 homeowners. Educational services are available in English, Spanish, and Creole throughout Miami-Dade County to prospective homebuyers.

Current Pipeline: Currently, the nonprofit developer members have about 700 units of rental and homeownership housing financed and underway. These units are a combination of rehab and new construction. More detail on these projects is provided below in the section on Coordinated Components That Will Not Be Directly Funded with NSP in Rating Factor 3.

Prior Housing Development Experience: Prior to the two-year period immediately preceding the date of this NOFA, the nonprofit developer members completed thousands of units of affordable rental housing and hundreds of units of affordable homeownership. Below are examples of some of that prior experience.

Carrfour: Since 1994, Carrfour has assembled over $70 million in funding commitments from federal sources, private equity and financing to support the acquisition, construction/rehabilitation and operation of 787 supportive housing units. 

Little Haiti Housing Association: LHHA has graduated 2200 clients from its Home Buyer Education program, placed over $12,643,394 of subsidy with home buyer clients and developed or co-developed 137 for-sale and 78 rental units.

Neighborhood Housing Services of South Florida: NHSSF manages a $1.65 million first time homebuyer loan portfolio with 66 borrowers; since 2003, trained/counseled over 4,000 families with over 850 of them becoming homeowners with $153,000,000 of financing; since 2007 assisted over 2,000 homeowners in foreclosure prevention with over 200 securing a loan modification or some other successful resolution; completed 90 single family rehab, 14 condo rehab and 12 new single family homeownership units and 75 rental rehab units.

Opa-locka Community Development Corporation: OLCDC has completed and/or is currently developing over 100 units of new affordable single-family homes and nearly 2,000 rental units.

St. John Community Development Corporation: SJCDC has completed 14 for-sale townhomes and 45 rental units. At different times over the years, SJCDC acquired and managed up to 175 rental units, but cleared the properties for redevelopment.

Urban League of Greater Miami: ULGM created over 1,000 units of affordable housing. At present they have over 1,200 units in the pre-development stage.

Other Relevant Experience: In addition, the nonprofit Consortium members manage thousands of units of affordable rental housing. They have completed thousands of square feet of commercial real estate and assisted hundreds of businesses with fa�ade renovation and business loans. Some members operate Community Development Financial Institutions (CDFIs). Members operate Economic Empowerment and Financial Literacy programs including tax preparation and EITC application assistance, computer literacy training and after school tutoring. They organize community festivals and forums. Some provide case management, employment services, life skills training, and recovery support. They organize Homeowners Clubs. Lending and real estate sales services are also made available to low, moderate and middle-income families.

While demolition is not specifically proposed as an NSP2-funded activity, Consortium members have demolished 108 dilapidated units during the two-year period immediately preceding the date of this NOFA and demolished units prior to that when necessary.

Tasks, Skills & Resources: In each of the projects comprising the recent, current and prior experience, the Consortium members served as the developers, acquiring the property, developing plans, securing financing, hiring and overseeing the development team including the general contractor, completing construction or rehab and selling or leasing the units including program marketing and management of waiting lists for potential residents. For rental property, they either manage the asset, overseeing a property manager or manage the units themselves. Units completed and underway include REO properties and properties requiring financial work-outs. The experience, skills and network of professionals garnered through the completion of these units provides the relevant capacity to complete the proposed NSP2 activities. The projects have each required accessing operating and investment capital. Sources of operating capital have included public grants, private contributions and foundation grants and project developer overhead and fees. Almost all the projects have involved some amount of private financing in conjunction with the public funding and Consortium members have extensive experience in securing, closing on and repaying private financing, an integral part of successfully completing any NSP2 program.

A small sampling of recent and pipeline projects include the following:

Working productively with other organizations: The Consortium and its members have worked productively with each other and other private and public organizations. In exploring the NSP2 application, the Consortium reached out to a dozen different nonprofit organizations, the six municipalities in the target geography and the government of Miami-Dade County. Six nonprofit organizations and one municipality agreed to join the Consortium. In compiling the application, the Consortium has coordinated, and will continue to coordinate throughout the implementation, with Miami-Dade County and the Cities of Miami, Miami Gardens, North Miami Beach and Opa-locka, in addition to the Consortium member, the City of North Miami and the fair housing nonprofit organization, HOPE, Inc.

Consortium Members have a long history of working productively with other organizations. Members have had funding agreements with the City of Miami, Miami-Dade County, the State of Florida, Florida Housing Finance Corporation, U.S. HUD and various private sources. The Members have had financing agreements with the Enterprise Community Investment, Florida Community Loan Fund, Local Initiatives Support Corporation, National Equity Fund, NeighborWorks� America and private banks including BankAtlantic, CitiBank, Espiritu Santo Bank, HSBC, Wachovia, and Washington Mutual. For implementation of the NSP2 program, NHSSF as the Lead Member will coordinate the expertise and resources of the National Community Stabilization Trust with the needs of Consortium members to find NSP-eligible properties for acquisition. Consortium members have worked productively with each other. For example, Little Haiti Housing Association partnered with NHSSF on the development and sale of 68 homes, a number of them financed through the City of North Miami.

City and regional planning - The nonprofit Consortium members participate annually in the County�s and Cities� Consolidated Planning Processes. In addition, they are all members of the South Florida Community Development Coalition, which coordinates their participation in City, County, regional and State policy development and advocacy. On a regional and statewide level, they participate through the Florida Alliance of Community Development Corporations.

b. Management structure (10 points)

1) Management:

CONSORTIUM MANAGEMENT: In accordance with the NOFA, the Consortium agreement provides for the Lead Member to act in a representative capacity for all Consortium Members and assume overall responsibility for ensuring that the NSP2 program is carried out in compliance with all NSP2 requirements and pursuant to the NSP2 Application. The Members agree that they will cooperatively carry out the NSP2 Program Requirements. If the NSP2 Application is selected, the Lead Member shall be the direct grant recipient and, before the grant is awarded, will enter into Consortium Funding Agreements (�Funding Agreements�) with the Non-Profit Consortium Members and the City. These Funding Agreements will be executed no later than December 1, 2009 and will describe the specific activities of each consortium member under the NSP2 program, including specific timetables for completion and applicable requirements in Appendix 1 of the NOFA, and will provide for remedies for the lead agency if the member doesn't produce.  Each funding agreement will explicitly authorize the Lead Agency to act as or hire an internal auditor to carry out internal audits of any NSP2-assisted activity.

The Miami-Dade NSP Consortium will establish a committee consisting of one senior staff person from each Member to assist with administration of the NSP2 Program. While the exact responsibilities of the Committee will be decided upon collectively, by all Members, after the HUD funding decision, the Committee will review and recommend decisions, such as the acquisition of properties, to the Miami-Dade NSP Consortium Lead Member. Ultimate responsibility rests with the Lead Member.

The Lead Agency will use Housing Developer Pro to provide consistent specifications and pricing for all rehabs completed with the NSP program. The construction management process will be both digital and online, including specifications, scopes of work, bid packages, bid submissions, payment processing, and change order processing.

ROLE OF EACH CONSORTIUM MEMBER:

Carrfour Supportive Housing, Little Haiti Housing, Neighborhood Housing Services, Opa-locka CDC and St. John CDC will purchase and rehabilitate homes and residential properties that have been abandoned or foreclosed upon, in order to sell, rent, or redevelop such homes and properties. Urban League and St. John CDC will redevelop demolished or vacant properties as housing. While the tenure and type of housing developed by each member will depend on available properties, Little Haiti Housing, Neighborhood Housing Services and Opa-locka CDC will look to acquire and rehabilitate housing for homeownership. Carrfour, Opa-locka CDC and St. John CDC will look to acquire and rehabilitate rental housing and Urban League and St. John CDC will look to develop new construction, rental housing.

For activities in North Miami, the City of North Miami will assist in the following.


a) Planning the Consortium�s neighborhood stabilization and revitalization strategies;

b) Identifying properties to target for the Non-Profit Members to acquire and redevelop;

c) Contribute property and/or matching funding if and when available;

d) Accessing available information and data regarding the target areas;

e) Provide expedited permit processing and periodic site inspections;

f) Where applicable, identify, prequalify, and qualify home buyers and provide down payment assistance, when available, to eligible home buyers;

g) The City is authorized to assume all responsibility for environmental review, decision-making, and action for proposed projects within its jurisdiction on behalf of the Consortium in accordance with the requirements of 24 CFR Part 58. Non-Profit Members will assist with the compilation of the Environmental Review Record.


LEAD AGENCY MANAGEMENT STRUCTURE AND STAFFING:

NHSSF management structure includes a volunteer board of directors following the John Carver model of nonprofit board management, emphasizing values, vision and empowerment of both board and staff.

Arden Shank, President & Executive Director, oversees the 26-member staff, board and investor functions, organizational planning and resource development. Arden joined NHS after 15 years with an Indiana NeighborWorks� organization. He has over 20 years of management experience with community-based, housing not-for-profits, from new start-ups to organizational restructuring, and college level teaching to fundraising, capital project implementation, and public policy. He is a graduate of the first Advanced Practitioner Program, an 18-month program developed jointly by NeighborWorks� America and the Kennedy School at Harvard for experienced CDC executive directors. Arden is the President of the South Florida Community Development Coalition board of directors, which educates and advocates on behalf of community development in Miami-Dade County and a board member of the National NeighborWorks� Association.

David Harder, Manager, NHS Housing Development LLC, Lead Member Construction Manager, has been involved in affordable housing development and construction since 1990. Prior to moving to Miami, David was a general contractor in Winnipeg, Canada. Since 1999, he has provided project and construction management services. He holds an active Florida General Contractor License. Working through partnerships, David develops and builds from 50 to 75 units of affordable housing a year. He has accredited professional certification for LEED from the US Green Building Council and is a Certifying Agent and energy rater for the Florida Green Building Coalition.

Roy Carlton, CFO, joined NHS in 2006. His twenty-five year career includes seventeen years as CFO or controller. Before coming to Florida, Roy was CFO/CIO for a south-suburban Chicago not-for-profit that helps people with development disabilities. Jorge Diaz-Silveira, Director of Lending, oversees processing homebuyer loan applications through submission, approval and closing, selects or develops lending programs and provides services in both English and Spanish. Jorge joined NHS after a successful 28-year career with his own mortgage company. He was Past President of the Florida Association of Mortgage Brokers, Miami Chapter, an instructor with the Florida Association of Mortgage Brokers and teaches the Miami-Dade College Mortgage Broker Licensing course. He is certified by the NeighborWorks� America in Mortgage Lending. Jackie Duran, Director of Home Ownership Promotion and Preservation, supervising a staff of 11, gives direction to homebuyer education classes, pre & post-purchase counseling, and credit counseling & mitigation assistance, foreclosure intervention and prevention activities including foreclosure clinics. A former real estate agent, Jackie brings over 15 years of experience in real estate, home counseling and lending. Deborah Goldsmith, Director of Marketing, has worked in public relations and marketing for over 20 years, including public information for county government, consulting, freelance journalism, marketing, public relations, and nonprofit fundraising. She has served on several not for profit Boards and is active in community events. Suzanne Weiss, Real Estate Sales/Associate Director, has been in real estate development, sales, lending and loan workouts for more than 30 years, and since 2001 has worked exclusively for nonprofit housing organizations. She is a licensed real estate broker and recently opened Homeownership Realty, LLC, a real estate brokerage affiliate of NHS, to provide a full bundle of services to NHS clientele. She serves on the boards of local and state groups that focus on affordable housing and community economic development, including the Florida Alliance of CDCs. Suzanne is a graduate of the University of New Orleans. Sharon Y. Williams, Director of Community Building and Organizing, brings over 25 years experience in community development, program development and implementation, real estate development and sales, and non-profit management. As a native Miamian, her knowledge of the Brownsville and surrounding communities serve as an asset to NHS. She serves on various community boards.


MEMBER MANAGEMENT STRUCTURES AND STAFFING:

Carrfour Supportive Housing: Stephanie Berman, President, has over 13 years experience working with homeless families and a Master�s Degree from Harvard University in administration, planning and social policy. Stephanie previously served as Director of Emergency Shelter Services for the Children�s Home Society. Doug Mayer, Carrfour�s Vice President of Housing, with over 11 years real estate development experience, previously served as Vice President of Development at Jubilee CDC. He has successfully developed affordable condos for sale, apartments for the elderly under HUD�s Section 202 program and housing for the homeless with Carrfour. John Harrison, has over 30 years experience in all phases of project construction, design development and project delivery with a solid background in start ups, business development, operations, strategic planning and sales. Carlos Toledo, Vice President of Crossroads Management, LLC, Carrfour�s property management company, has over 20 years affordable housing development and property management experience.

Little Haiti Housing Association: Samuel Diller, at LHHA for 13 years, 6 years as Executive Director, is responsible for overall strategic planning and operations and all housing developments. In the last 3 years alone, the number of clients becoming homeowners has nearly doubled from the previous 13 years. Mr. Diller holds a BA in Social Science from Siena Heights University. Brenda Trigg, Director of Operations and Community Programs, has worked in the Little Haiti non-profit sector community for over 20 years and at LHHA for 8 years. She is responsible for fiscal management and operational support. Ms. Trigg is also fluent in Creole and holds a BA in Spanish from the University of Richmond. Jacques Saint Louis, Director of Housing, with LHHA for 17 years, leads design, development, oversight and operation of LHHA�s award winning 1st time homebuyer program (2005 HOPE Awards) and affordable housing program. He is responsible for marketing to the community, partner developers and local government. He is fluent in French, Creole and English. Valentia Lamothe, Home Buyer Counselor, with LHHA for 5 years, is certified by NeighborWorks of America as Homeownership Counselor and for Foreclosure Prevention Counseling. Ms. Lamothe is fluent in French, Creole and English. David Carty, Client Intake Specialist, with LHHA for 5 years (2 as an AmeriCorps VISTA member), is responsible for client intake, collecting and managing client data and Home Buyer Education classes. He has certification from NeighborWorks of America for Homeownership and Post-occupancy Counseling. Mr. Carty is fluent in French, Creole, Spanish and English. Jean Denis Joseph, Home Ownership Facilitator, with LHHA for 9 months as an AmeriCorps member, assesses client status in the home buyer training process and assists in the Homebuyer Education classes. Mr. Joseph has completed significant course work at Miami-Dade College in mortgage finance. He is fluent in French, Creole and English.

Opa-locka Community Development Corporation: Willie Logan founded OLCDC in 1980 and has been its President and CEO ever since. He has represented the area for 20 years first as mayor and then as state representative. He has been responsible for the CDC�s various residential development efforts and serves as the principal mortgage broker and underwriter for all of OLCDC�s lending transactions. Mr. Logan holds both Florida real estate and mortgage broker licenses, and has successfully completed a number of leadership and community development courses. He is presently working on his dissertation in economic and community development through the Southern New Hampshire University. Stephanie Willliams-Baldwin has extensive experience in affordable housing endeavors in Opa-locka, having been OLCDC�s Senior Vice President for Projects since 1981. She has been responsible for implementing all of the CDC�s programmatic activities. Lou McGann has been OLCDC�s Financial Manager for the past 9 years and designed and implemented the current financial and accounting system. He has nearly 40 years of finance experience, including residential and commercial underwriting and overall accounting management as the controller for four different for-profit companies. Bonnye Deese oversees marketing of the loan products and services, assists the Loan Processors and Mr. Logan in underwriting of potential borrowers and presents borrower and property information to the Loan Committee. She has managed youth programs, including dropout prevention and after-school enrichment for nonprofits and the Sanford (FL) Housing Authority. She completed a mortgage broker course at a local professional school. Tommie Frison is a Housing Counselor / Loan Originator, the primary intake person, identifying potential borrowers and working with them to address credit and other issues, both individually and in an 8-hour homebuyer workshop. He underwrites, monitors, and services loans. Mr. Frison has been certified in housing and mortgage counseling and loan loss mitigation. He is assisted by Wisly Bertrand. He previously coordinated a number of youth development programs for a nonprofit in Miami. Marcia Grant assists in outreach efforts to current and prospective homeowners, works with the home inspector and contractors to develop bids and scopes of work for home rehabilitation and ensures completeness of all loans before sale to Miami-Dade Housing Authority or other secondary market purchaser. She was previously program manager for a family health center in Miami.

St. John Community Development Corporation: David J. Alexander joined SJCDC as their new President/CEO in June 2003. Previously, since 1999, he was Vice President of a for-profit housing developer and consultant. From 1983 to 1998, as Executive Director/CEO of a nonprofit, he developed affordable housing, founded a Crisis Intervention Network and service delivery system for children and families, established a national demonstration anti-drug task force, and implemented commercial and residential rehabilitation programs. Susan Kelly is the Executive Assistant to the President. A Real Estate professional, she has been in the development and sale of private sector and affordable housing for over 15 years. Elaine Gordon, Vice President, Administration, with the CDC since 1986, is responsible for fiscal administration, including preparation of annual operating budgets and monthly financial reports; payroll systems management; grants writing and administration; and, contracts monitoring. Prior to joining SJCDC, Ms. Gordon served for more than 10 years as Secretary of Saint John Baptist Church, the SJCDC�s founding institution. Hired in September 1999, Hurlette R. Brown is Homeownership Counselor and Housing Program Manager, responsible for marketing, intake and screening, homeownership education, credit and budget counseling, coordination of homebuyer education workshops, and post-purchase counseling. Ms. Brown is also involved with the day-to-day management of the CDC�s multi-family properties, providing administrative support and assisting with tenant relations, intake, income verification, and record-keeping. Prior to joining the CDC, Ms. Brown was employed for more than four (4) years by the Miami-Dade Housing Agency as a Leasing and Contract Specialist, responsible for interviewing, screening, and income-certification of Section 8 applicants and tenants.

Urban League of Greater Miami: T. Willard Fair, President and CEO since 1963, evolved ULGM from a local CBO to a nationally recognized organization that has developed and managed more than 1,300 units with another 1,200 units currently in various stages of pre-development and construction. Mr. Fair has an M.S.W. in Social Work from Atlanta University and a B.S. in Sociology, Cum Laude from Johnson C. Smith University. Oliver Gross, President of New Urban Development, LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of ULGM, has primary responsibility for the acquisition, development, construction oversight, financing and property management of commercial and residential housing developments owned and/or managed by ULGM and its subsidiary entities. Mr. Gross has experience as a real estate developer, public administrator and commercial banker. He has certifications as a Real Estate Development Professional and a U.S.HUD Certified Occupancy Specialist. He has an M.S. in Social Administration from Case Western Reserve University and a B.S. in Business Administration from Florida A&M University.

2) References:

Consortium and All Members:


George Mensah, Director

City of Miami Community Development

444 SW 2nd Ave, 2nd Floor

Miami, FL 33130

(305) 416-1765

gmensah@miamigov.com

Shalley Jones-Horn

OCED

701 NW 1st Court, 14th Floor

Miami, FL  33136

786 469-2100

sjhorn@miamidade.gov


Carrfour Supportive Housing:

Tammy Haylock-Moore

WAMU-Community Lending

3030 N. Rocky Point Dr. West

Suite 365-8941RMFL

Tampa, Fl. 33607

(813) 282-2891
tammy.haylock-moore@wamu.net

Steve Smith

Enterprise Community Investment, Inc.

10227 Wincopin Circle Suite 800

Columbia, MD 21044

(410) 772-2723

ssmith@enterprisecommunity.com


Little Haiti Housing Association:

Greta Harris, Program Vice President, Local Initiative Support Corporation

One Monument Avenue - 413 Stuart Circle. Suite 300

Richmond, VA 23220

804.358.0690, x29

Gharris@lisc.org

Nery Torrent, Vice President
Community Development Lender

Ocean Bank
780 NW 42nd Avenue, Suite 625
Miami, Florida  33126-5597
Phone(305)569-5020
Ntorrent@oceanbank.com 


NHSSF:

Patricia Algaze, President

LinearOne, Inc.

21304 NE 19th Court

Miami, FL 33179

305-608-1281

psalgaze@aol.com

Eileen Fitzgerald, COO,

NeighborWorks America

1325 G St, NW, Suite 800

Washington, DC 20005

202-220-2452

efitzgerald@nw.org


Opa-locka Community Development Corporation:

Barbara Romani

Citibank
8750 Doral Blvd. MS 7-J

Doral, FL 33178

barbara.romani@citicorp.com

305 599-5775

Eugene N. Simmons, Assistant VP

City National Bank of Florida

25 West Flagler Street

Miami, Fl  33130

305 577-7263

eugene.simmons@citynational.com


St. John Community Development Corporation:

Marcia Barry-Smith, Executive Director

BankAtlantic Foundation

2100 Cypress Creek Road

Ft. Lauderdale, FL  33309

954-940-5021, mbarrysmith@bankatlantic.com

Paul Brodersen, Vice President

Wachovia Bank, NA

800 North Magnolia Avenue

Orlando, FL 32802

407-649-5636

paul.brodersen@wachovia.com


Urban League of Greater Miami:

Tony E. Crapp, Sr.

Executive Director

North Miami CRA

615 NE 124th Street

North Miami, FL 33161

305-899-0272

Crapp@NorthMiamiCRA.org

Dana Chestnut, Vice President

Washington Mutual Bank

1360 Peachtree St. NE, Suite 940

Atlanta, GA 30309

404-876-0734

Dana.chestnut@wamu.net



3. Rating Factor 3: Soundness of approach (45 points)

a. Proposed Activities (15 points)

(1) Overall neighborhood stabilization program

With NSP funds, the Consortium is targeting the completion of 1,255 units of rental and homeownership housing, with potential to roll over funds to an additional 116 units in the targeted geographic area.

In these targeted neighborhoods, the Consortium will implement a neighborhood stabilization and revitalization strategy that will seek to meet the primary objective of the CDBG and NSP programs of providing decent housing, a suitable living environment, and economic opportunity, principally for persons of low, moderate and middle-incomes. The NSP2 funds will assist in addressing the housing component of this strategy. Specific short-term outcomes in the targeted neighborhoods the Consortium seeks to accomplish include the following:

Specific long-term outcomes in the targeted neighborhoods the Consortium seeks to accomplish include the following:

The Consortium will strive to achieve these outcomes in coordination with other government agencies and programs. Consistent with the NSP2 emphasis, we seek a more rational use of land and other natural resources and the better arrangement of residential, commercial, industrial, recreational, and other uses. We will seek to conserve energy resources, improve energy efficiency, and utilize alternative and renewable energy sources. We will seek to make our developments sustainable and transit-oriented. We will support projects that optimize economic activity and jobs created or retained or that will provide other long-term economic benefits.

Coordinated Components That Will Not Be Directly Funded With NSP

With NSP2 funds, the Consortium will be expanding existing efforts to stabilize and revitalize the targeted geography. The Consortium has already been engaging in and achieving each of the short-term outcomes identified above. In addition to the units completed as referenced in the recent experience in Rating Factor 2, following are some of the projects Consortium members are currently undertaking. These projects are key components of the Neighborhood Stabilization strategy and financial commitments for them are provided in the Appendices as coordinated component program leverage.

The Consortium members will utilize other funds to augment the NSP activities in our neighborhood stabilization and revitalization strategy. Additional activities with other funds can include business assistance, improvement of owner occupied homes, housing counseling for residents purchasing non-NSP funded homes, foreclosure prevention, tenant case management, employment services, life skills training, drug and alcohol recovery support and after-school care.

(2) Uses of funds and firm commitments

To achieve the proposed outcomes, the Consortium will undertake the following activities.

Specifically, the requested funds will be targeted to the NSP activities as follows.


Proposed NSP2 Activity

Proposed Budget

Responsible Entities

(A) Establish financing mechanisms for purchase and redevelopment of foreclosed upon homes and

residential properties, including such mechanisms as soft-seconds, loan loss reserves, and shared-equity loans for low- and moderate-income homebuyers

$0


(B) Purchase and rehabilitate homes and residential properties that have been abandoned or foreclosed upon, in order to sell, rent, or redevelop such homes and properties

$58,100,000

Carrfour, LHHA,

NHSSF, OLCDC, SJCDC

(C) Establish land banks for homes and residential properties that have been foreclosed upon

$0


(D) Demolish blighted structures

$0


(E) Redevelop demolished or vacant properties as housing

$27,625,000

Urban League

SJCDC, LHHA

Administration

$3,650,000

NHSSF

TOTAL REQUEST

$89,375,000



NOTES: Some funds used to purchase and rehabilitate homes under (B) will remain with the units as second mortgage financing for homebuyers. Some funds will roll over to purchase and rehabilitate additional units. The rolled over funds may then remain with the units as second mortgage financing for the homebuyers of the additional units.

Administration may include a portion of Members� developer overhead and housing counseling as well as the Lead Members� fiscal and program administration.

Of the 1,255 units of rental and homeownership housing the Consortium is targeting to complete with NSP funds in the targeted geographic area, the Consortium expects that 540 units will be the purchase and rehabilitation of units for rental housing and 290 will be the purchase and rehabilitation of units for homeownership using an average of $70,000 NSP per unit, and 425 units will be new construction rental on redeveloped demolished or vacant properties using an average of $65,000 NSP per unit. With an average $20,000 per unit of the homeownership funds rolling over, the Consortium expects to complete a potential additional 116 homeownership units. Following are per-unit sample calculations of the uses of NSP and leveraged funds for homeownership rehab, rental rehab and new construction rental. A Homeownership Affordability Analysis is included below in the income targeting portion of this Rating Factor.

RENTAL REHAB SAMPLE PER UNIT PRO FORMA




Acquisition



40,000





Rehab Hard Costs



40,000





Soft Costs



5,000





Developer OH & Profit

13%

11,050














TOTAL DEVELOPMENT COST


$96,050














NSP




70,000





Private Debt



26,050














TOTAL SOURCES



$96,050














Average Monthly Rent



600





Vacancy




(30)














EGI




570














Operating Expenses Including Reserves

(375)














NOI




195





Debt Service



(156)


$26,050

6.00%

30 year










Cash Flow



$39














DSC




1.25






NEW RENTAL SAMPLE PER UNIT PRO FORMA




Acquisition



10,000




Construction & Development Hard Costs

111,720




Soft Costs



38,280




Developer OH & Profit


15,000












TOTAL DEVELOPMENT COST


$175,000












NSP




65,000




Private Debt



20,000




LIHTC Equity, Miami-Dade County HOME & Surtax

90,000












TOTAL SOURCES



175000












Monthly Rent



550




Vacancy




(28)












EGI




523












Operating Expenses Including Reserves

(375)












NOI




148




Debt Service



(120)

$20,000

6.00%

30 year









Cash Flow



$28












DSC




1.23





PER UNIT CALCULATION






SINGLE-FAMILY HOME OWNERSHIP

NSP

Other



100,000

acquisition


70,000

30,000

$20,000

revolves

60,000

rehab (hard & soft)



60,000



15,000

Dev OH & Profit



15,000



175,000




70,000

105,000




Firm Commitments

Several Consortium members are committing vacant property they�ve acquired for redevelopment as housing. Several lines of credit and funding has been secured that can be used for Consortium NSP2 activities. Details of each of these are provided under Rating Factor #4 with documentation in the appendices.

b. Project completion schedule. (5 points)

Separate project completion schedules are provided for homeownership (projected to be 290 units), rental rehab (projected to be 540 units) and new construction rental (projected to be 425 units).

Homeownership Schedule:


QUARTER

UNITS ACQUIRED

UNDER REHAB

COMPLETE AND OCCUPIED

NSP FUNDS EXPENDED

% NSP

FUNDS EXPENDED

Qtr 1 2010

20



$1,400,000


Qtr 2 2010

30

20


$2,100,000


Qtr 3 2010

30

30

20

$2,100,000


Qtr 4 2010

30

30

30

$2,100,000


Qtr 1 2011

30

30

30

$2,100,000


Qtr 2 2011

30

30

30

$2,100,000

59%

Qtr 3 2011

 30

30

30

$2,100,000

 

Qtr 4 2011

 30

 30

30

$2,100,000

 79%

Qtr 1 2012

 30

 30

 30

$2,100,000

 

Qtr 2 2012

 30

 30

 30

$2,100,000

 

Qtr 3 2012

 

 30

 30

$2,100,000

 

Qtr 4 2012

 

 

 30

$2,100,000

 100%

TOTAL

290

290

290

$20,300,000


Rental Rehab Schedule (projected to be 540 units):

Since the projects are not yet identified and the number of units per project is unknown, the following schedule anticipates three projects at 180 units each. If more, smaller projects are done, there will be greater overlap of schedules. Also, since three Consortium Members (Carrfour, Opa-locka CDC, St. John CDC) anticipate doing rental rehab, it is likely that projects will occur simultaneously and sooner in the schedule.


TASKS

NSP FUNDS

EXPENDED

%

NSP

Qtr 1

2010

Identify & Negotiate Property � Project 1

Environmental Clearance � Project 1

Commence & Complete Work Write-Up �Project 1

Appraisal / Pro Forma Analysis � Project 1



Qtr 2

2010

Acquisition � Project 1

Develop Bid / RFP Package � Project 1

Request Davis-Bacon Wage Determination � Project 1

Bid Advertisement � Project 1

Pre-Bid Conference � Project 1

Bid / RFP Opening � Project 1

Selection / Award � Project 1

Verify GC Is Not On Debarment List � Project 1

Close On Financing � Project 1

Obtain Permits � Project 1

Pre-Construction Conference � Project 1

Execute GC Contract � Project 1

$12,600,000

33%

Qtr 3

2010

Begin Construction Management & Monitoring � Project 1

Begin Labor Compliance (Weekly Payrolls & Payment Certifications) � Project 1

Begin Monthly Construction Payment Requests � Project 1



Qtr 4

2010

Continue Construction � Project 1

Identify & Negotiate Property � Project 2

Environmental Clearance � Project 2

Commence & Complete Work Write-Up �Project 2

Appraisal / Pro Forma Analysis � Project 2



Qtr 1

2011

Complete Construction � Project 1

Release Of Liens (Obtain Release / Waiver Of Liens From All Contractors And Suppliers) � Project 1

Conduct Final �Walk-Thru� � Project 1

Certificate Of Completion � Project 1

Lease Up � Project 1

Acquisition � Project 2

Develop Bid / RFP Package � Project 2

Request Davis-Bacon Wage Determination � Project 2

Bid Advertisement � Project 2

Pre-Bid Conference � Project 2

Bid / RFP Opening � Project 2

Selection / Award � Project 2

Verify GC Is Not On Debarment List � Project 2

Close On Financing � Project 2

Obtain Permits � Project 2

Pre-Construction Conference � Project 2

Execute GC Contract � Project 2

$12,600,000

67%

Qtr 2

2011

Begin Construction Management & Monitoring � Project 2

Begin Labor Compliance (Weekly Payrolls & Payment Certifications) � Project 2

Begin Monthly Construction Payment Requests � Project 2



Qtr 3

2011

Continue Construction � Project 2



Qtr 4

2011

Complete Construction � Project 2

Release Of Liens (Obtain Release / Waiver Of Liens From All Contractors And Suppliers) � Project 2

Conduct Final �Walk-Thru� � Project 2

Certificate Of Completion � Project 2

Identify & Negotiate Property � Project 3

Environmental Clearance � Project 3

Commence & Complete Work Write-Up �Project 3

Appraisal / Pro Forma Analysis � Project 3



Qtr 1

2012

Acquisition � Project 3

Develop Bid / RFP Package � Project 3

Request Davis-Bacon Wage Determination � Project 3

Bid Advertisement � Project 3

Pre-Bid Conference � Project 3

Bid / RFP Opening � Project 3

Selection / Award � Project 3

Verify GC Is Not On Debarment List � Project 3

Close On Financing � Project 3

Obtain Permits � Project 3

Pre-Construction Conference � Project 3

Execute GC Contract � Project 3

$12,600,000

100%

Qtr 2

2012

Begin Construction Management & Monitoring � Project 3

Begin Labor Compliance (Weekly Payrolls & Payment Certifications) � Project 3

Begin Monthly Construction Payment Requests � Project 3



Qtr 3

2012

Continue Construction � Project 3



Qtr 4

2012

Complete Construction � Project 3

Release Of Liens (Obtain Release / Waiver Of Liens From All Contractors And Suppliers) � Project 3

Conduct Final �Walk-Thru� � Project 3

Certificate Of Completion � Project 3

Lease Up � Project 3




New Construction Rental Schedule (projected to be 425 units):

The schedule is based on three projects, each on land owned by Consortium members. The Urban League�s Villages project is being submitted simultaneously to the Florida Housing Finance Corporation for an allocation of Low Income Housing Tax Credits. One of St. John Community Development Corporation�s projects is simultaneously being submitted to Miami-Dade County for HOME or General Obligation Bond (GOB) funds. The other of SJCDC�s projects will be submitted and developed in the following year.



TASKS

NSP FUNDS

EXPENDED

%

NSP

Qtr 1

2010

Environmental Clearance � Village & SJCDC Project 1

Complete Plans � Village & SJCDC Project 1



Qtr 2

2010

Village & SJCDC Project 1:

Develop Bid/RFP Package with Wage Determination

Bid Advertisement

Pre-Bid Conference

Bid / RFP Opening; Selection / Award

Verify GC Is Not On Debarment List

Obtain Permits

Close On Financing

Pre-Construction Conference/Execute GC Contract



Qtr 3

2010

Village & SJCDC Project 1:

Begin Construction Management & Monitoring

Begin Labor Compliance (Weekly Payrolls & Payment Certifications)

Begin Monthly Construction Payment Requests

$7,500,000

$800,000

30%

Qtr 4

2010

Village & SJCDC Project 1:

Continue Construction

Environmental Clearance � SJCDC Project 2

Complete Plans � SJCDC Project 2

$7,500,000

$800,000

60%

Qtr 1

2011

Village & SJCDC Project 1:

Continue Construction

$7,750,000

$837,500

91%

Qtr 2

2011

Complete Construction - Village

Complete Construction � SJCDC Project 1

Release Of Liens (Obtain Release / Waiver Of Liens From All Contractors And Suppliers) � SJCDC Project 1

Conduct Final �Walk-Thru� � SJCDC Project 1

Certificate Of Completion � SJCDC Project 1

Lease Up � SJCDC Project 1



Qtr 3

2011

Develop Bid / RFP Package � SJCDC Project 2

Request Wage Determination � SJCDC Project 2

Bid Advertisement � SJCDC Project 2

Pre-Bid Conference � SJCDC Project 2

Bid / RFP Opening � SJCDC Project 2

Selection / Award � SJCDC Project 2

Verify GC Is Not On Debarment List � SJCDC Project 2

Close On Financing � SJCDC Project 2

Obtain Permits � SJCDC Project 2

Pre-Construction Conference�SJCDC Project 2

Execute GC Contract � SJCDC Project 2



Qtr 4

2011

Begin Construction Management � SJCDC Project 2

Begin Labor Compliance (Weekly Payrolls & Payment Certifications) � SJCDC Project 2

Begin Monthly Construction Payment Requests � SJCDC Project 2

$800,000

94%

Qtr 1

2012

Continue Construction � SJCDC Project 2

$800,000

97%

Qtr 2

2012

Continue Construction � SJCDC Project 2

$875,000

100%

Qtr 3

2012

Continue Construction � SJCDC Project 2



Qtr 4

2012

Complete Construction � SJCDC Project 2

Release Of Liens (Obtain Release / Waiver Of Liens From All Contractors And Suppliers) � SJCDC Project 2

Conduct Final �Walk-Thru� � SJCDC Project 2

Certificate Of Completion � SJCDC Project 2




c. Income targeting for 120 percent and 50 percent of median (5 points)

The Consortium will meet NSP income targeting requirements serving persons earning at or below 120% Area Median Income (AMI) with at least 25% of the funds serving individuals and families with incomes at or below 50% AMI. We expect to achieve deeper income targeting than required with a high percentage of funds serving persons earning at or below 80% AMI and by producing units serving as low as below 30% AMI. Following are the relevant income levels for the Consortium�s target geography.



The deep targeting requirements are likely to be fulfilled through the rental rehab component of the Consortium program. One Consortium member, Carrfour Supportive Housing, has extensive experience in developing affordable housing for extremely low-income homeless residents. But other Consortium members also have experience in serving very low-income residents through affordable rental housing. While the rental rehab pro forma above shows average rent rates of $600 per month, rent rates will range from those affordable to incomes below 30% AMI to affordable to 120% AMI.

Homeownership units will serve somewhat higher incomes likely to range below 80% AMI to 120% AMI. Families will contribute a down payment of their own up to 3% of the purchase price. Consortium members will assist the homeowners in securing a first mortgage from a private lender in an amount that will keep their principle, interest, taxes and insurance (PITI) payments affordable. A sample Homeownership Affordability Analysis is provided below. Note that it shows $50,000 of the estimated average $70,000 NSP remaining with the unit. A projected average $20,000 per unit will roll over to assist with additional units.


HUD NSP HOMEOWNERSHIP SAMPLE




AFFORDABLITY ANALYSIS












Sales Price to Buyer




$175,000

down pmt- borrower 3%




$5,250

NSP Subordinate Mortgage




$50,000








1st mtg






$119,750








pmt - first: 30 year, 6%




$718

pmt - second:




$0

taxes & insurance





$401








Total Housing Expense




$1,119








Monthly Ratio





30%















Annual Borrower's Income




$44,760

% of median (adjusted for family size)



74%

Family Size





4


d. Continued affordability (5 points)

The Consortium adopts HOME program standards for affordable rent definitions, rent limitations, utility allowances and other provisions at 24 CFR 92.252(a), (c), (e), and (f), and 92.254 except the Consortium adopts lengthier affordability periods than required. For rental, the Consortium will ensure continued affordability for a minimum of 40 years. For rehabbed homeownership units, the Consortium will ensure continued affordability for a minimum of 20 years. If new construction homeownership units are completed, the Consortium will ensure continued affordability for a minimum of 30 years.

For homeownership, the Consortium will secure NSP funds with a deed restriction or subordinate mortgage that requires the homebuyer, for the affordability period, to maintain the home as their primary residence, sell at an affordable price to an income-eligible homebuyer or repay the funds on a declining basis. Any repaid funds will allow reinvestment into future NSP housing. The Consortium will require each NSP2-assisted homebuyer to receive and complete at least 8 hours of homebuyer counseling from a HUD-approved housing counseling agency before obtaining a mortgage loan. Several Consortium members are HUD-approved housing counseling agencies.

For rental, the Consortium will secure the NSP funds with a deed restriction or subordinate mortgage that requires the developer member, for the affordability period, to continue to maintain affordable rents as defined above or repay the funds on a declining basis. The restriction will include a requirement to maintain the appropriate amount of units as affordable to below 50% AMI. Any repaid funds will allow reinvestment into future NSP housing.


e. Consultation, outreach, communications (5 points)

(1) Local Government Consultation: In compiling the application, Consortium representatives met with representatives of Miami-Dade County and the Cities of Miami, Miami Gardens, North Miami Beach and Opa-locka, in addition to the Consortium member, the City of North Miami. Each was invited to participate in the Consortium and solicited their input in the application. The Consortium will continue to coordinate throughout the implementation, with each of the municipalities and the County.

(2) Proposed Outreach and Affirmative Marketing Actions: All advertising will bear the equal housing logo. Besides newspaper advertising, notices will be distributed to a network of governmental agencies and service providers serving clients in need of affordable housing. Written advertisements will include the TTY number. Marketing materials will indicate time, date and location where applications will be available. An Affirmative Housing Plan, specific to the property, will be developed by the Agent and approved by the Owner. The plan will be reviewed annually. We will also solicit waiting lists from housing agencies to incorporate into our mailing list. To ensure the successful marketing of the properties, we will maintain a network of housing and related organizations that can assist us in finding residents and, further, in meeting residents' needs. Local housing authorities will be notified of vacancies. Service providers in the area will be sent announcements of vacancies. Resident selection will be done in a nondiscriminatory manner according to program requirements. The application and supporting documentation will be reviewed by a staff person, who will conduct a credit check, review documentation, verify income and make a final decision on selection. At least two staff persons will participate in the selection process.

(3) Continued Communication of Program Design, Progress, Opportunities and Results

As required under the NOFA, the Consortium advertised for public comment allowing 10 days for comment (comments will continue to be accepted beyond the required 10-day period and incorporated as possible) and posted the required details of the Consortium plan on the NHSSF website.

The Lead Member, NHSSF, will continue to post reports of activities on the NHSSF website. Individual members each maintain their own website and will post NSP2 project information on their and other members� activities. The Consortium will continue to coordinate throughout the implementation, with each of the municipalities and the County. Consortium members will advertise the availability of affordable housing developed with NSP2 funds in various media forms and languages. Each Consortium member maintains communication with relevant community organizations, businesses and public officials. Each of the nonprofit Consortium members has Board members from the communities. Board members will also facilitate ongoing communication with the community. The Consortium will process any complaints in a timely manner (respond within 15 working days, if feasible). Through these methods, the Consortium will ensure local citizens and others are informed about program policies.


f. Performance and monitoring (10 points)

(1) Monitoring Plan: Consortium funding agreements will require that members provide narrative email reports on a monthly basis to the Lead Member on the status and activities undertaken on each development activity during the predevelopment process. These reports will cover key federally mandated requirements of the NSP2 program including, but not limited to, the following.

Environmental: For activities outside the City of North Miami, nonprofit Consortium members will compile the Environmental Review Record and submit it to the Lead Member. The Lead Member and the relevant Consortium Member will (1) supply HUD with all available, relevant information necessary for HUD to perform for each property any environmental review required by 24 CFR part 58; (2) carry out mitigating measures required by HUD or select alternate eligible property; and (3) not acquire, rehabilitate, demolish, convert, lease, repair or construct property, nor commit or expend HUD or local funds for these program activities with respect to any eligible property, until HUD approval of the property is received. For activities in the City of North Miami, the City will act as the responsible entity.

Procurement Procedures and Other Administrative Requirements: Through requests for disbursements and reports, the Lead Member will ensure compliance with administrative requirements in 24 CFR 570.502(b), specifically including the requirements and standards of OMB Circular No. A-122, ``Cost Principles for Non-profit Organizations'' and OMB Circular A-110 implemented at 24 CFR part 84, ``Uniform Administrative Requirements for Grants and Agreements With Institutions of Higher Education, Hospitals and Other Non-Profit Organizations''. Similarly, the Lead Member will ensure compliance with Section 3 and the Uniform Relocation Act (URA) as required in 24 CFR part 570 and Appendix 1, paragraph K of the NOFA. Each of the Consortium members has extensive experience with implementing these regulations.

Wage Rate Requirements. The Lead Agency will maintain files for contractor compliance with wage rate requirements. The Consortium Members will submit reports on prevailing wages paid to laborers and mechanics in compliance with the Davis-Bacon Act. Each of the Consortium members has extensive experience with implementing these regulations.

To comply with HUD reporting requirements, Consortium funding agreements will require members provide quarterly performance reports, as HUD prescribes, no later than 7 days (allowing the Lead Member time to provide information to HUD) following the end of each quarter, beginning 7 days after the completion of the first full calendar quarter after grant award. In addition to this quarterly performance reporting, each recipient will report monthly on its NSP obligations and expenditures beginning 7 days after the end of the 21st month following receipt of funds, and continuing until reported total expenditures are equal to or greater than half the total NSP grant. After HUD has accepted a report showing such expenditure of grant funds, the monthly reporting requirement will end and quarterly reports will continue until the 33rd month, when the monthly cycle will repeat until the entire NSP2 grant has been expended or the 36-month deadline reached. Each report will include information about the uses of funds, including, but not limited to, the project name, activity, location, national objective, funds budgeted and expended, the funding source and total amount of any non-NSP funds, numbers of properties and housing units, beginning and ending dates of activities, and numbers of low- and moderate-income persons or households benefiting.

During the rehab/construction process, the Lead Member will use Housing Developer Pro to provide consistent specifications and pricing for all construction/rehabs completed with the NSP program. The construction management process will be both digital and online, including specifications, scopes of work, bid packages, bid submissions, payment processing, and change order processing. Members will provide a monthly report to the Lead Member manager showing construction progress on all properties funded through NSP. The report will include construction costs to date and percent complete. Detailed inspections will take place upon each draw request including photo documentation of work in place and regular reports will be provided by Consortium members to the Lead Member. A 10 percent retainer will be required on each construction/rehab contract to ensure completion of the scope of work, that all systems are operational, and that final punch list items are completed.

(2) Internal Auditing: Each funding agreement will explicitly authorize the Lead Member to act as or hire an internal auditor to carry out internal audits of any NSP2-assisted activity including continually examining potentially risky areas of program operations and management and providing regular and valuable feedback to program managers and to those who hold them accountable. This feedback will include identification of risky management practices and missing or ineffective internal controls, areas that are not in compliance with program requirements, and ineffective implementation of established policies. Specifically, the Lead Member�s President & Executive Director will have responsibility for overseeing the internal auditing process. The positions directly responsible will vary based on fiscal & administrative and program components and will likely be either specifically hired for the purpose or be assigned to the Lead Member�s CFO (fiscal & administrative) and the Lead Member�s Housing Development and Construction Manager (program components).

Each of the Consortium members has extensive experience in following monitoring requirements including those for CDBG and HOME from various participating jurisdictions including Miami-Dade County and the Cities of Miami and North Miami, as well as state and local funding from the same entities. Members have experience with monitoring from other sources of funding including the Low Income Housing Tax Credit, U.S. HUD Supportive Housing and Section 202 Programs, State of Florida�s SAIL program, Federal Home Loan Bank�s Affordable Housing Program and EDGE Loans, NeighborWorks� America, Florida Community Loan Fund, Jewish Funds for Justice, National Science Foundation, private banks and the Department of Education. Together, the Consortium has managed hundreds of millions of dollars.

Each member organization utilizes some form of fund accounting software to account for funds received by the organization. Each invoice goes through several levels of review prior to payment. They maintain data and information on costs, personnel, capital budget, and services that are project focused and /or customer focused. The organizations� fiscal practices meet all state/local and federal labor/tax/benefits regulations. Each organization�s fiscal administration is overseen by a Board Finance Committee, comprised of professionals in the field.

Rating Factor 4: Leveraging or removal of substantial negative effects (10 points)

a. Leverage.

Several Consortium members are committing property they�ve acquired for redevelopment as housing. The Urban League of Greater Miami (ULGM) is committing, for ULGM�s redevelopment as at least 350 new construction affordable rental units with NSP2 funds, approximately 11 acres of land valued at $7.6 million, which it owns through its Village Miami, LTD,. St. John Community Development Corporation (SJCDC), which owns property through its St. John Properties Corporation, is committing, for SJCDC�s redevelopment as approximately 60 to 75 affordable rental units with NSP2 funds, land valued at approximately $690,000 and two vacant buildings valued at approximately $350,000. SJCDC has secured $1,083,000 FY2009 HOME funds from Miami-Dade County for the vacant buildings, which it is calling St. John Village Apartments. Little Haiti Housing Association is committing land, valued at approximately $258,000, for redevelopment with NSP2 funds as 17 units at Villa Jardin III with $1,155,450 in financing commitment.

For Consortium NSP2 units, Neighborhood Housing Services of South Florida (NHSSF) is leveraging the use of proceeds from a $1,000,000 revolving line of credit from HSBC Bank USA, a $400,000 business line of credit from HSBC, a $250,000 line of credit from TZEDEC Economic Development Fund and an additional new $1.5 million line of credit from HSBC specifically for acquisition and rehabilitation of REO properties purchased from HSBC and other lenders. In addition, as a member of the NeighborWorks Network, NHSSF is an eligible applicant to participate in the National Community Stabilization Trust�s Acquisition Program, which will provide an efficient and cost effective mechanism for transferring vacant and foreclosed properties directly from financial institutions including lenders, servicers, investors and government-sponsored entities to members of the Consortium. The Consortium has also had discussions with HSBC and Chase Bank.

Leverage commitments for coordinated components of the NSP strategy are also provided in the appendices, totaling nearly $83 million.

b. Value of Destabilizing Influences Proposed To Be Removed

Of the 1,255 units of housing the Consortium is initially targeting to complete with NSP funds in the targeted geographic area, 830 units will be the purchase and rehabilitation of units that have been abandoned or foreclosed upon and 425 units will be on redeveloped vacant properties. In addition, the Consortium expects to complete, with roll-over funds, the purchase and rehabilitation of an additional 116 units that have been abandoned or foreclosed upon for a total of 946 units that have been abandoned or foreclosed upon.

According to http://www.huduser.org/datasets/nsp_foreclosure_data.html, the United States Postal Service data, the sum total of all vacant residential properties in the target area is 5,826. (See breakdown of census tracts and vacancies in the Appendices.) The value using the HUD-provided rubric of destabilizing influences the Consortium proposes to remove as part of our NSP2 program is 24.36% (946 X 1.5/5,826).

5. Rating Factor 5: Energy efficiency improvement and sustainable development

a. Transit accessibility.

The Consortium NSP target area is currently transit accessible with convenient bus service (local bus service every 20 minutes during rush hour or an express commuter bus) and, for some census tracts, Metrorail service. According to http://www.co.miami-dade.fl.us/transit/transitfacts.asp, Miami-Dade Transit is the 12th largest public transit system in the USA. According to http://www.co.miami-dade.fl.us/transit, following are the Metrorail and excerpts of rush hour service for 2 sample bus schedules serving the target area. Numerous other bus routes similarly serve the area.



Metrorail Schedule


Hours of Operation

Metrorail operates from 5 a.m. to midnight, seven days a week. Service may be extended one hour after the end of downtown Miami special events.

Metrorail service frequency:

  • Trains arrive every 7 - 8 minutes during weekday rush hours

  • Every 15 minutes at midday

  • Every 30 minutes from about 7:30 p.m. until closing

  • Weekend service runs every 30 minutes


Bus Route 2 SCHEDULE (Rush Hour Excerpts) Service: Weekday Direction: Northbound



SW 1 St
& Miami
Ave

Overtown
Metrorail
Station

NW 36 St
& 2 Ave

NW 2 Ave
& 79 St

NE 2 Ave
& 84 St

NW 91 St
& 2 Ave

NW 119 St
& North
Miami Ave

NW 167 St
& North
Miami Ave

163 Street
Mall

06:25AM

06:28AM

06:39AM

06:50AM

06:53AM

:

:

:

:

06:45AM

06:48AM

06:59AM

07:14AM

:

:

07:25AM

07:38AM

07:47AM

07:05AM

07:09AM

07:21AM

07:36AM

07:39AM

:

:

:

:

07:25AM

07:29AM

07:41AM

07:56AM

07:59AM

:

:

:

:

07:45AM

07:49AM

08:01AM

08:16AM

08:19AM

:

:

:

:

08:05AM

08:09AM

08:21AM

08:36AM

:

08:40AM

08:51AM

09:04AM

09:13AM

08:25AM

08:29AM

08:41AM

08:56AM

08:59AM

:

:

:

:

08:45AM

08:49AM

09:01AM

09:15AM

09:18AM

:

:

:

:

09:05AM

09:09AM

09:21AM

09:35AM

:

:

09:45AM

09:58AM

10:07AM

09:25AM

09:29AM

09:41AM

09:55AM

09:58AM

:

:

:

:

09:45AM

09:49AM

10:01AM

10:15AM

10:18AM

:

:

:

:











03:45PM

03:49PM

04:04PM

04:20PM

04:24PM

:

:

:

:

04:05PM

04:09PM

04:24PM

04:40PM

:

:

04:53PM

05:06PM

05:17PM

04:25PM

04:29PM

04:44PM

05:00PM

05:04PM

:

:

:

:

04:45PM

04:49PM

05:04PM

05:19PM

05:23PM

:

:

:

:

05:05PM

05:09PM

05:23PM

05:38PM

:

:

05:50PM

06:02PM

06:13PM

05:25PM

05:29PM

05:43PM

05:58PM

06:02PM

:

:

:

:

05:45PM

05:49PM

06:03PM

06:18PM

06:22PM

:

:

:

:

06:05PM

06:09PM

06:23PM

06:38PM

:

:

06:50PM

07:02PM

07:11PM

06:25PM

06:29PM

06:43PM

06:58PM

07:02PM

:

:

:

:


Bus Route 16 SCHEDULE (Rush Hour Excerpts) Direction: Southbound




163 Street
Mall

NE 125 St
& 6 Ave

NE 79 St
& Biscayne
Blvd

NE 36 St
& Biscayne
Blvd

A Arsht
Mover/Bus
Terminal

Downtown
Bus
Terminal

05:06AM

05:20AM

05:32AM

05:40AM

05:46AM

05:56AM

05:20AM

05:34AM

05:46AM

05:54AM

06:01AM

06:14AM

05:30AM

05:44AM

06:00AM

06:12AM

06:19AM

06:32AM

05:43AM

06:02AM

06:18AM

06:30AM

06:37AM

06:50AM

06:00AM

06:19AM

06:35AM

06:47AM

06:54AM

07:08AM

06:13AM

06:32AM

06:48AM

07:02AM

07:12AM

07:26AM

06:30AM

06:49AM

07:06AM

07:20AM

07:30AM

07:44AM

06:44AM

07:07AM

07:24AM

07:38AM

07:48AM

08:02AM

07:02AM

07:25AM

07:42AM

07:56AM

08:06AM

08:20AM

07:20AM

07:43AM

08:00AM

08:14AM

08:24AM

08:38AM

07:38AM

08:01AM

08:18AM

08:32AM

08:42AM

08:56AM

07:56AM

08:19AM

08:36AM

08:50AM

09:00AM

09:14AM

08:15AM

08:38AM

08:55AM

09:09AM

09:18AM

09:32AM

08:33AM

08:56AM

09:13AM

09:27AM

09:36AM

09:50AM

08:51AM

09:14AM

09:31AM

09:45AM

09:54AM

10:08AM

09:11AM

09:32AM

09:49AM

10:03AM

10:12AM

10:26AM

09:29AM

09:50AM

10:07AM

10:21AM

10:30AM

10:44AM







03:26PM

03:50PM

04:07PM

04:20PM

04:29PM

04:44PM

03:44PM

04:08PM

04:25PM

04:38PM

04:47PM

05:02PM

04:02PM

04:26PM

04:43PM

04:56PM

05:05PM

05:20PM

04:20PM

04:44PM

05:01PM

05:14PM

05:23PM

05:38PM

04:38PM

05:02PM

05:19PM

05:32PM

05:41PM

05:56PM

04:57PM

05:21PM

05:38PM

05:51PM

06:00PM

06:14PM

05:16PM

05:40PM

05:57PM

06:10PM

06:18PM

06:32PM

05:35PM

05:59PM

06:16PM

06:28PM

06:36PM

06:50PM






b. Green building standards.

The Consortium will comply with the required NSP2 rehabilitation standards as outlined in the attached application appendix and new construction and gut rehabilitation activities will be required to exceed the Energy Star for New Homes standard. The Consortium will provide consistent green rehabilitation of the homes by performing an energy audit prior to the development of a scope of work for each rehab. Lead Agency staff members are LEED Accredited Professional certified, Certified Energy Raters, and Certifying Agents for the Florida Green Building Coalition. The energy audit will enable the Consortium members to customize each rehab to increase the energy efficiency of the home. All rehab will meet Florida Green Building Coalition Green Home certification standards (www.floridagreenbuilding.org), as well as HUD Housing Quality Standards. The Consortium chose the Florida Green Building Coalition standards because, in addition to addressing the same issues as national standards, they address the specific climate conditions faced in our South Florida tropical environment. In addition, the Consortium will include the following green features where appropriate: hurricane resistant windows and doors, white reflective roofing, secondary water barriers in roofing system, enhanced insulation, Energy Star appliances, no VOC point, healthy/sustainable flooring, high-efficiency air conditioners, non-formaldehyde glues in cabinets and vanities, water saving fixtures, and Energy Star light fixtures. On average, these green features will save homeowners 20 to 25 percent of their energy costs. In addition to the green rehab, standard rehab items will include: electrical system certification to code and or upgrade, plumbing system certification to code and or upgrade, new kitchen cabinets when needed, new flooring, interior and exterior painting.


c. Re-use of cleared sites.

All sites cleared, if any, will be re-used within the term of the NSP2 grant as replacement housing.


d. Deconstruction.

The Consortium will use deconstruction techniques for any NSP2 demolition activities including salvaging and re-using materials resulting from demolition activities. In addition, for any materials that are not salvaged, preference will be given to waste companies that recycle dumpster materials. A waste company used previously has documented recycling of a full 88% of dumpster materials.


e. HUD may award one point for other sustainable development practices

For the new construction developments, the Consortium will attempt to implement Passive Solar activities including orienting the building to make the greatest use of passive solar heating and cooling. The Consortium will site, design, engineer and wire the developments to accommodate installation of photovoltaic panels in the future (photovoltaic-ready). The Consortium will attempt to connect the developments to Surrounding Neighborhoods by providing three separate connections from the developments to sidewalks or pathways in surrounding neighborhoods. The Consortium will not locate the project within 100 feet of wetlands; 1,000 feet of a critical habitat; or on steep slopes, prime farmland or park land. The Consortium will implement EPA�s Best Management Practices for erosion and sedimentation control during construction, select native trees and plants that are appropriate to the site�s soils and microclimate and locate trees and plants to provide shading in the summer and allow for heat gain in the winter. Additional, other aspects are covered under the Florida Green Building Coalition Green Home certification standards addressed above.


Rating Factor 6: Neighborhood transformation and economic opportunity (5 points)

(1) Consistency with comprehensive, regional, or multi-jurisdiction plan

The applicant certifies that the proposed Consortium activities are consistent with the following established plans:

S. Florida Regional Planning Council�s Strategic Regional Policy Plan for South Florida

http://www.sfrpc.com/ftp/pub/srpp/SRPP%2006-07-04.pdf

Miami-Dade County�s 2008-2012 Consolidated Plan, http://www.miamidade.gov/ced/library/Resources/FY_2008_2012_Consolidated_Plan

City of Miami�s 2004-2009 Consolidated Plan, (http://www.miamigov.com/communitydevelopment/ConPlan/index.htm)

City of North Miami Comprehensive Plan, (http://www.northmiamifl.gov/business/planning_development/planning/) ,

City of Miami Gardens 5-Year HUD Consolidated Plan 2006-2011,

(http://www.miamigardens-fl.gov/cd/PDF/2006%20-%202011%20CMG%20Consolidated%20Plan.pdf)

City of North Miami Beach�s Comprehensive Plan

http://www.citynmb.com/index.asp?Type=B_BASIC&SEC=%7BE456918F-6FB8-400F-9545-B8E3AAF15417%7D


(2) Describe how your proposed NSP2 activities relate to and increase the effectiveness of that established plan.

Each of the above referenced plans cites the need for the following:

The Consortium�s proposed NSP2 activities will increase the effectiveness of these established plans by coordinating NSP2 funds with local, State and other national resources to expand affordable housing, reduce housing cost burden, rehabilitate deteriorated, vacant and partially vacant residential properties and redevelop vacant parcels back to productive use as housing.